JavaScript Frameworks for Modern Web Dev

JavaScript Frameworks for Modern Web DevI am thrilled to announce the publication of my newest book, JavaScript Frameworks for Modern Web Dev, available now from APress!

A year ago my friend and former co-worker Tim Ambler approached me with a project: a list of strong frameworks and libraries in the JavaScript space that can each be effectively introduced in a single chapter. Over the last twelve months we wrote numerous drafts and revisions, and created a somewhat frightening amount of source code for these sixteen topics:

  1. Bower
  2. Grunt
  3. Yeoman
  4. PM2
  5. RequireJS
  6. Browserify
  7. Knockout
  8. AngularJS
  9. Kraken
  10. Mach
  11. Mongoose
  12. Knex and Bookshelf
  13. Faye
  14. Q
  15. Async.js
  16. Underscore and Lodash

Obviously, the scope of each topic is greater than its chapter, but the book’s goal is to be a quick but thorough introduction to the core concepts in each framework and library. The source code is non-trivial and executable, so a reader can see concepts in action while following along in the text.

Some of the technologies covered have aged (like fine wine!), and some are much younger, but we believe that each has staying power and stands well among its peers. Between us we have used all of these technologies in our own projects and in production deployments, and while we cannot claim complete expertise, we humbly submit that, to the best of our knowledge, the information here is both sound and practical.

We sincerely hope that this book brings much value to you and your team!

 

 

hintme

I use jshint to lint JavaScript code in my projects. Typically I include a project-wide .jshintrc file which contains a set of the linting options I wish to be applied whenever jshint scans my code. I keep a gist with a list of all possible options and the settings I normally use. This works pretty well but I thought it might be nice to create a tool that would interactively prompt a user for jshint settings and then create a .jshintrc file based on user response. So I created hintme, a small node.js CLI tool that does just that.

hintme

Right now it iterates through every jshint option and prompts the user for a setting value. Each setting has a default value, which may be chosen by simply hitting enter at the prompt. Defaults were chosen based on a simplistic criteria, one which I tend to refine a bit:

  1. the default for enforcing options is always TRUE
  2. the default for relaxing options is always FALSE
  3. the default for environment options is always FALSE

I also want to add some better command arguments, such as being able to specify known settings via a switch (e.g.: –use=eqeqeq=true;forin=true). The user wouldn’t be prompted for these settings since they’ve been specified already.

The –live=true switch forces hintme to screen-scrape the jshint options page and then prompt the user for the most “current” options instead of using the options.json file included with the hintme module. This is probably a tenuous way to get the most current options but it works for now.

I intend to add a suite of unit tests soon, and probably break up the code a bit. Releases < 1.0.0 should be considered rough drafts.

If you have any feature suggestions please leave a comment!

Use node to change your bash prompt

I use the bash shell with git completion on my Mac. It’s awesome except it makes my bash prompt (PS1) kind of long and ungainly:

I wanted to optimize space in my terminal, so I searched for alternative ways to display the bash prompt and found an elegant solution on askubuntu.com that reduces each directory in PWD to its first letter by evaluating the output of the `pwd` command and piping it through sed (streaming editor).

It works really well, but I wanted the last portion of the path displayed as the full directory name. I’m not familiar with sed syntax, and found myself thinking: I know how I would do this in node.js. So I copied the example, opened `.bash_profile`, and hacked up some code.

Turns out that when you invoke node with the `-e` parameter it will evaluate the string that follows. That gave me the exact prompt that I wanted:

Is it elegant? Not really. Is sed syntax more terse? Absolutely. But you know what, I do what I want and I had fun doing it. 😀

And yeah, I know, zsh.

Fun with C# and Node.js

A co-worker was looking for a nodejs module to generate UUIDs the other day, and it inspired me to write one that leverages C# to generate guids.  I wrote a simple C# class and compiled it with Mono as an executable.  It takes a single argument which is the number of guids to generate.  This executable is executed with the ‘child_process’ module that comes packaged with node, and receives its arguments from my node module.  The console output is then read and parsed, and returned to the calling JavaScript code.

I am definitely interested in further exploring a possible bridge for C# mono assemblies in node.  It seems that others are as well.