hintme

I use jshint to lint JavaScript code in my projects. Typically I include a project-wide .jshintrc file which contains a set of the linting options I wish to be applied whenever jshint scans my code. I keep a gist with a list of all possible options and the settings I normally use. This works pretty well but I thought it might be nice to create a tool that would interactively prompt a user for jshint settings and then create a .jshintrc file based on user response. So I created hintme, a small node.js CLI tool that does just that.

hintme

Right now it iterates through every jshint option and prompts the user for a setting value. Each setting has a default value, which may be chosen by simply hitting enter at the prompt. Defaults were chosen based on a simplistic criteria, one which I tend to refine a bit:

  1. the default for enforcing options is always TRUE
  2. the default for relaxing options is always FALSE
  3. the default for environment options is always FALSE

I also want to add some better command arguments, such as being able to specify known settings via a switch (e.g.: –use=eqeqeq=true;forin=true). The user wouldn’t be prompted for these settings since they’ve been specified already.

The –live=true switch forces hintme to screen-scrape the jshint options page and then prompt the user for the most “current” options instead of using the options.json file included with the hintme module. This is probably a tenuous way to get the most current options but it works for now.

I intend to add a suite of unit tests soon, and probably break up the code a bit. Releases < 1.0.0 should be considered rough drafts.

If you have any feature suggestions please leave a comment!

Use node to change your bash prompt

I use the bash shell with git completion on my Mac. It’s awesome except it makes my bash prompt (PS1) kind of long and ungainly:

I wanted to optimize space in my terminal, so I searched for alternative ways to display the bash prompt and found an elegant solution on askubuntu.com that reduces each directory in PWD to its first letter by evaluating the output of the `pwd` command and piping it through sed (streaming editor).

It works really well, but I wanted the last portion of the path displayed as the full directory name. I’m not familiar with sed syntax, and found myself thinking: I know how I would do this in node.js. So I copied the example, opened `.bash_profile`, and hacked up some code.

Turns out that when you invoke node with the `-e` parameter it will evaluate the string that follows. That gave me the exact prompt that I wanted:

Is it elegant? Not really. Is sed syntax more terse? Absolutely. But you know what, I do what I want and I had fun doing it. 😀

And yeah, I know, zsh.