JavaScript Frameworks for Modern Web Dev

JavaScript Frameworks for Modern Web DevI am thrilled to announce the publication of my newest book, JavaScript Frameworks for Modern Web Dev, available now from APress!

A year ago my friend and former co-worker Tim Ambler approached me with a project: a list of strong frameworks and libraries in the JavaScript space that can each be effectively introduced in a single chapter. Over the last twelve months we wrote numerous drafts and revisions, and created a somewhat frightening amount of source code for these sixteen topics:

  1. Bower
  2. Grunt
  3. Yeoman
  4. PM2
  5. RequireJS
  6. Browserify
  7. Knockout
  8. AngularJS
  9. Kraken
  10. Mach
  11. Mongoose
  12. Knex and Bookshelf
  13. Faye
  14. Q
  15. Async.js
  16. Underscore and Lodash

Obviously, the scope of each topic is greater than its chapter, but the book’s goal is to be a quick but thorough introduction to the core concepts in each framework and library. The source code is non-trivial and executable, so a reader can see concepts in action while following along in the text.

Some of the technologies covered have aged (like fine wine!), and some are much younger, but we believe that each has staying power and stands well among its peers. Between us we have used all of these technologies in our own projects and in production deployments, and while we cannot claim complete expertise, we humbly submit that, to the best of our knowledge, the information here is both sound and practical.

We sincerely hope that this book brings much value to you and your team!

 

 

Fun with C# and Node.js

A co-worker was looking for a nodejs module to generate UUIDs the other day, and it inspired me to write one that leverages C# to generate guids.  I wrote a simple C# class and compiled it with Mono as an executable.  It takes a single argument which is the number of guids to generate.  This executable is executed with the ‘child_process’ module that comes packaged with node, and receives its arguments from my node module.  The console output is then read and parsed, and returned to the calling JavaScript code.

I am definitely interested in further exploring a possible bridge for C# mono assemblies in node.  It seems that others are as well.